Tag Archives: Bourbon

Baking With Booze: Maker’s Mark gingerbread cookies with Bourbon cinnamon glaze

9 Dec

These boozy cookies were a huge hit at my holiday party! Here’s the recipe:

Maker’s Mark Gingerbread Cookies With Bourbon Cinnamon Glaze

Makes 40 cookies using 4 1/2-inch-tall Maker’s Mark bottle cookie cutter

Cookies:

3 cups flour
3/4 tsp baking soda
1 tsp ground cloves
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1 stick of butter (room temperature)
1/2 cup of sugar
1 egg
1/4 cup molasses
1 tbs white vinegar
1/4 cup Maker’s Mark Bourbon

Mix flour, baking soda, cloves, cinnamon and ginger in a bowl and set aside. Cream together butter and sugar in a separate bowl. Mix in egg, molasses, vinegar and Bourbon and incorporate well. Add dry ingredients and combine until dough forms. (If dough seems too dry, add 1 egg white.)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Divide dough into three pieces, wrap in parchment and refrigerate for at lease one hour. On a floured surface, roll out dough to about 3/8-inch thick and cut with cookie cutter. Gather scraps and repeat until all dough is used.

Place cookies on nonstick or greased cookie sheets. Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Allow to cool.

Glaze:

2 tbs Maker’s Mark Bourbon
2 cups powdered sugar
2 tbs lemon juice
1 tsp ground cinnamon
24-30 drops red food coloring

Combine Bourbon, sugar, lemon juice and cinnamon in a small saucepan. Stir over low heat until mixture becomes a soft glaze, about three minutes. Mix in food coloring. Gently dip the bottle neck of each cookie, front down, and allow glaze to drip slightly to mimic the Maker’s Mark wax. Lay flat until glaze hardens.

Serve with a spiced cider, such as Rittenhouse Wassail Punch.

© 2012 Amber Drea and New York Drinkie. Unauthorized use or duplication of images and text without express and written permission is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be quoted, provided that clear credit is given to Amber Drea and New York Drinkie with links directing to the original content.

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Vegas Drinkie: Reviving vintage cocktails and class in the Nevada desert

8 Jan

Sin City is certainly known for its decadence and debauchery, but all I care about are its drinks. On a recent trip, I decided to check out some places off the beaten path, aka The Strip. A new restaurant called The Barrymore had opened inside the Royal Resort, a small hotel on Convention Center Drive, just north of many of the large casinos. With a combination of 1950s supper club classiness and modern elegance, The Barrymore offers an eclectic menu of American cuisine, alongside an extensive wine list (with 50 selections priced less than $50 a bottle) and delicious signature cocktails ($10.50).

I started off with the Basil2, made with Basil Hayden Bourbon, Dolin Dry vermouth, fresh sour, lemon syrup and Thai basil, served in a Martini glass. It was a balanced blend of rich whiskey, sweet citrus and herbal notes.

I followed up with the Funny Guy, comprising Zaya rum, Cointreau, orange juice and Old Fashioned bitters. The drink was tasty and refreshing.

After dinner, my friend Candice and I headed downtown. Local mixologist Tobin Ellis of Bar Magic had recommended Downtown Cocktail Room (DCR), a dark lounge located on Las Vegas Boulevard at Fremont Street. DCR reminded me of New York’s speakeasy-style spots, with mustachioed or vested bartenders, intimate booths and tables, and hand-crafted drinks ($8 to $11).

The cocktails are rated according to their level of approachability, ranging from
1 (easy) to 5 (advanced palate). I ordered the Leeki My Tiki, a Level 1 concoction featuring Pisco, tiki bitters, cranberry juice and egg white. The warming spices, winter fruit and velvety texture made for a satisfying drink.

Candice tried the Funky Pear Medina, which at Level 2.5 (somewhere between approachable and mildly complex) was a bit too much for her. However, I enjoyed its mix of rum, amaro, pear purée, sparkling wine and nutmeg—sweet and slightly minty, with a brightness from the fresh fruit and bubbly.

I wish I’d had more time to explore Las Vegas, but I was happy with what I did experience there. On my list for next time: The Chandelier and Vesper Bar at The Cosmopolitan and Herbs & Rye on Sahara Avenue. Viva Las Vegas!

 © 2012 Amber Drea and New York Drinkie. Unauthorized use or duplication of images and text without express and written permission is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be quoted, provided that clear credit is given to Amber Drea and New York Drinkie with links directing to the original content.

Chicago Drinkie: Achatz’s Aviary and Cantu’s iNG offer experimental experiences in the Windy City

10 Nov

Since the last time I was in Chicago, two cutting-edge venues opened right around the corner from each other in the West Loop area: The Aviary from Grant Achatz of Alinea—next to his aptly named Next restaurant—and iNG Restaurant from Homaro Cantu of Moto, which is also nearby. I scored a reservation for The Aviary at 8:00 and showed up early to try one of the famed “flavor changing cocktails” at iNG. I sat at a long red counter in the stark minimalist space and selected a Smoked Manhattan, made with Bulleit Bourbon, sweet vermouth and Angostura bitters, with a rinse of Arbeg single malt Scotch, which is the “peatiest and smokiest of all the Islay malts,” according to the whisky’s website. The cocktail was indeed smoky.


My husband Jeb and my friend Kenan arrived, and we were handed the list of flavor changing cocktails, along with a bowl of cranberry cheddar popcorn. Head bartender Mario Catayong explained the concept behind this special menu: First, we sip our drinks to experience the original flavor, then we pop the “miracle berry” pill and let it dissolve, coating our mouths with the protein miraculin, which comes from a small African fruit.


The pill suppresses the tongue’s sour and bitter taste receptors, making the flavor of the cocktails change. To provide a sharp contrast, Mario gave us some lemon wedges, which tasted like hard lemon candy after taking the miracle berry pill. We ordered our cocktails, and Mario prepared the drinks in a laboratory-like room with a red porthole window.


I couldn’t decide between the Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie or the PB&J, but eventually opted for the latter. The cocktail featured Frangelico, rum, crème de cassis and vertjus (a tart green grape juice), served in a Martini glass with a rim of caramel and crushed peanuts. It was nutty and salty-sweet, but the flavor didn’t really change much after taking the miracle berry.


Kenan had the Skinny Margarita Under a Tequila Sunrise, which mixed Tequila, lime and orange juices—sans sugar—served with a “pipette” dropper. The sourness was definitely subdued, allowing the sweetness to come through.


After my friend Leah showed up, we sucked down our drinks and headed to The Aviary. Thankfully, the host was able to accommodate a last-minute addition to the party of three. I recognized the space from its old days as a bottle service-style nightclub called The Office. The current décor is a vast improvement, though it’s a little more “luxe hotel lobby” than “contemporary cocktail lounge” due to the high-backed booth seating, pewter upholstery and crystal chandeliers. No matter—we were there for the drinks, not the design. Instead of a bartender manning a bar, chefs prepare the cocktails in a kitchen that’s sectioned off by a steel fence.



The libation list is divided into two parts—à la carte cocktails and a three-course tasting menu. Since most of the drinks cost around $18, I went for the $45 prix-fixe (I’m always looking for a deal). The server delivered a complimentary round of amuse-bouche and glasses of water, each containing a single large ice shard—one of the more than 20 different types of ice used to cool and flavor the drinks. Our cocktails came out almost immediately. For my appetizer course, I chose the Quince, a light carbonated concoction of Pisco, quince juice and ginger syrup, served in a soda bottle wrapped in a brown paper bag. Leah selected the Chartreuse, which comprised three small servings of Green and Yellow Chartreuses mixed with blueberry, honeydew and pineapple juices and chilled with mint ice cubes, presented in a Chartreuse V.E.P. box on a bed of fresh herbs.


Kenan ordered the Oolong, which is a mixture of gin and pear brandy that’s heated in a two-tiered glass beaker over an open flame at the table, then steeped with tea, herbs, nuts and dried fruit. Science!


Jeb got the infamous In the Rocks, which is an Old Fashioned inside a sphere of ice that must be broken using a mini slingshot. (I would have taken a photo, but The Aviary doesn’t allow flash photography, so I had to sneak shots when the staff wasn’t looking.) My main course was the Peach, a bold blend of wheat whiskey, white Port, peach purée, maple syrup and sweet annie, served in a highball glass filled with tiny frozen Angostura balls.


For his second drink, Jeb opted for the Cranberry, made with 12-year-old Bourbon and cranberry ice cubes, topped with chervil foam. It was very pretty.


And finally, my dessert course was the sweet, fizzy Cream Soda, a “distilled” combo of aged rum, Licor 43, vanilla and vanilla ice—Ice Baby!


The bill totaled $136 (tip included)—well worth it, in my opinion. In fact, I’m going again in December!

© 2011 Amber Drea and New York Drinkie. Unauthorized use or duplication of images and text without express and written permission is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be quoted, provided that clear credit is given to Amber Drea and New York Drinkie with links directing to the original content.

Ahoy, Mateys: A new bar sails into Brooklyn to deliver punch bowls and Belgian brews

9 Feb

On a frigid Friday night in February, my husband and I dared to venture south of Grand Street to a new bar aptly dubbed The Drink on Manhattan Avenue in East Williamsburg. We came in out of the cold and were greeted by a blast of warm, humid air filled with the aroma of hot, cinnamony apple cider. Mismatched furniture, nautical knickknacks lining the off-white walls and the still-standing Christmas tree in the corner added to the homey vibe.

Flea market finds evoked Grandpa’s dusty library.

The well-lit place housed a healthy crowd huddled near the bar and scattered among the five or six tables. Luckily there was an open stool at the end of the counter, and I took a seat. I asked for a cocktail menu, which listed only punch bowls for $43 a pop that contain roughly 10 drinks. The venue does serve one punch by the glass—The Old Gunwhale ($6)—comprising Maker’s Mark Bourbon, fresh grapefruit juice, chamomile tea syrup and spiced cranberry bitters. The mug full of fragrant pink liquid, though iced, warmed my tummy.

The Drink’s hand-crafted cocktails feature fresh juices and herbs, as well as house-made tinctures and syrups. Other punch bowl include the Perfect Storm, mixing Coruba dark Jamaican rum, lime juice, green tea syrup, ginger syrup, Angostura bitters and soda, and the Resolution, blending Juvé y Camps Cava, Pierre Ferrand Cognac, apricot nectar, lemon juice and cinnamon syrup. A few patrons had opted for the super-sized portion, and a lovely fellow named Lee offered me a cup from his punch bowl, which he was sharing with a friend. They’d chosen the Charter, a concoction of Espolón Blanco Tequila, lime juice, ginger syrup, salt tincture, cassis syrup and soda, which was quite tasty—sweet and refreshing and you could barely taste the Tequila. Dangerous!

In addition to the punch bowls, The Drink offers three different Hot Toddies ($7), made with Scotch, orange and clove; Bourbon, lemon and cranberry; or Jameson Irish whiskey and smoked green tea. The delicious odor permeating the room came from the mulled Wassail Cider ($5), featuring apple cider, tart cherry, apricot and either Barbancourt rhum or Bourbon. Of course, The Drink also serves any cocktail upon request. The beer list comprises mostly Belgian labels (each $10 a bottle), such as La Botteresse Brune, a strong brown ale brewed with sage. There is also a variety of German, Australian, Japanese and American beers. The bar was out of Schlenkerla ($9), a smoked light lager from Germany, so my husband chose Full Sail Brewing’s Session Black lager ($5) from Hood River, Oregon. The Drink pours beer on draft as well.

With the quality of the cocktails and the beer selection, it’s not surprising that this place involves Brooklyn heavyweights like Frank Cisneros of Dram lounge, Will Jones of Spuyten Duyvil tavern and Matt Lang of Fette Sau BBQ. I’m not sure what they keep in this barrel, but I bet it’s something good.

© Amber Drea and New York Drinkie, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of images and text without express and written permission is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that clear credit is given to Amber Drea and New York Drinkie with links directing to the original content.

Soul Mates: Booze finds its perfect match at Edible Manhattan’s mixer

30 Jan

Food paired with wine or beer is fairly common; less so is food paired with cocktails, the complexity of which can often dominate the dishes. However, if anyone knows how to bring together delicious drinks and bountiful bites, it’s Edible Manhattan, and the magazine’s Good Spirits event at (Le) Poisson Rouge in Washington Square Village definitely delivered. Restaurants and bars teamed up with spirits brands (and one wine) to showcase their best cuisine and cocktails, while foodies and drinkies swarmed throughout the two rooms, dutifully tasting every offering.

One thing’s certain: There was plenty of pig. I began my tour with Peels’ pork and beef sausage hot dog, topped with Brussels sprout slaw (yum!) and Bourbon cherry mustard, and washed it down with the Cherry Crush, comprising Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery’s American Fruits Sour Cherry Cordial, rehydrated cherries, star anise simple syrup, lime juice and a splash of club soda. The drink’s sweet and tangy cherry flavor perfectly complemented the savory sausage.

Next I tried Huckleberry Bar’s peanut butter and banana sandwich, consisting of peanut butter mousse, banana, peanuts, mayonnaise, salt and orange bitters on toasted white bread. It was like a grown-up version of my favorite after school snack, especially when accompanied by The New York Times, which mixed Death’s Door White Whisky, Amaro CioCiaro, Chelsea Brewing’s Imperial Stout and orange bitters. The crisp cocktail cut through the sandwich’s salty creaminess and cleansed the palate.

Huckleberry co-owner Andrew Boggs exhibited the tools of the trade.

I swung by the table of Long Island’s Wölffer Estate Vineyard for a taste of its 2008 Chardonnay, which had great acidity and balance with just a touch of oakiness, and a bite of cheddar polenta topped with crispy bacon and apple purée, courtesy of Jimmy’s 43.

Nearby, Fort Defiance served up deviled eggs, made with smoked black pepper and pickled mustard seeds, and the King Bee, which combined Darjeeling tea-infused Comb vodka—which is distilled from honey—with lemon, a dash of Benedictine liqueur and Prosecco. I love me some deviled eggs!

In the other room, Fette Sau had a spread of barbecued Duroc pork belly, matched with Compass Box’s The Peat Monster, a light and smoky blend of Islay and Highland Scotch whiskies. I’m usually not a fan of peaty whisky, but this one I could drink.

Next up was Palo Santo’s tostada de chicharrón (fried pork rind), topped with a spicy pineapple sauce and presented on a piece of newspaper, street food-style. The dish was paired with a mix of Nonino Chardonnay grappa and crushed pineapple, served in a chili salt-rimmed cup. I found the chunky concoction to be somewhat difficult to drink, and its astringent flavor overpowered the tostada—a rare miss of the night.

Macao Trading Co. delivered with its mushroom and truffle croquette and a tartare of bacalhau—Portuguese for “salted cod”—atop a slice of baguette. Providing a fragrant, citrusy complement, the Macao cocktail comprised lavender-infused St-Germain elderflower liqueur and a sugar cube soaked with lemon bitters, topped with dry Zardetto Prosecco.

Here’s the author, happy and buzzed, in front of a piece from Kate Casanova’s art exhibition “Spoils.” Very festive.

I headed back to the main room and hunted down Lani Kai, Julie Reiner’s new Hawaiian lounge, which served tasty kalua pork on a soft poi pancake and the Pacific Swizzle cocktail, mixing lime juice, passion fruit purée and Don Q Cristal rum that had been infused with rose hips, hibiscus and lemongrass.

Julie is one of New York City’s mover and shakers—she also co-owns Flatiron Lounge, Pegu Club and Clover Club.

The final pork dish of the night was Fonda’s pork in guajillo adobo over white rice, matched with a Ginger Margarita that blended Karma Tequila, Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur and lime juice.

For dessert, Northern Spy Food Co. offered a decadent sticky winter pudding soaked with Tuthilltown Spirits’ Hudson Baby Bourbon hard sauce and served with nutmeg custard. The accompanying Tuthilltown Manhattan, made with Hudson Manhattan Rye Whiskey, further warmed my tummy.

To end the evening, I chased Tumbador Chocolate bonbons with a couple shots of Bache Gabrielsen Cognac. There were also Serendipitea and Dallis Coffee stations, but their drinks didn’t contain liquor, so why bother?

© Amber Drea and New York Drinkie, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of images and text without express and written permission is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that clear credit is given to Amber Drea and New York Drinkie with links directing to the original content.